Accumulating Cash and Improving Your Business’ Cash Flow

A. Thomas DeWoskin

By A. Thomas DeWoskin



Part 2 of a 5-part series: Options for Small Business Owners in Financial Distress

turbulenceCash is how your business likely will get through its difficulties. Simply put, obtain as much cash as you can, and spend it sparingly.

In Part 1 of this five-part series on options for small business owners in financial distress, I suggested some ideas about improving the operation of your small business in order to survive different types of disasters. In Part 2, I’ll share some thoughts on improving your cash position and cash flow.

First, look at your business as a source of cash.

  • Account receivables: Contact your customers with outstanding account receivables and encourage them to make payment. Provide discounts for prompt payment and charge interest on past due amounts if you can.
  • Line of credit: If you have unused room on a line of credit, draw on it now while you still can. If things get bad enough, your lender might freeze your line and cut off further draws.
  • Business loan: If you need to approach a lender for a new loan or an increase in an existing one, do your homework. No lender is going to give you money just because you ask for it.
  • Business plan: Prepare a business plan or update your current plan to reflect current conditions. You may need help from your accountant, attorney, consultant or similar outside sources in order to do so. Your plan may include both a “needs” list and a “wants” list.
  • How much? Determine how much money you need to implement your plan whether your business plan is to simply tread water, grow, or pivot in another direction. Break it down so your potential lender understands how it is going to save your business.
  • How to pay it back? Once you have a rough number, consider how you’re going to repay it. Your business’ survival depends in part on its ability to pay its debts. Consider both the amount and duration of the likely payments.
  • Avoid “hard money” lenders: When looking for lenders, be very careful to avoid “hard money” lenders and their draconian interest rates and repayment schedules. These can include factoring companies who purchase your receivables, MCA lenders who say they are “purchasing” your accounts receivable but in reality are lending against them, and other types of lenders with outrageous interest rates and impossible repayment terms.

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$5,000 Grants Available to Restaurants and Small Businesses in St. Louis County

Ruth Binger

By Ruth Binger



covid-19 helpIn response to the tightening of COVID-19 restrictions for restaurants and some other small businesses, St. Louis County Executive Sam Page announced $5,000 grants through the Small Business Rapid Deployment Fund.

Grants can be used for operating expenses or business costs (e.g., rent and payroll) and purchases needed to adapt to COVID-19 restrictions (e.g., heaters and tents) “incurred between April 1 and December 16, 2020 as a direct result of COVID-19.”

According to the fund’s website, restaurants and small businesses must meet the several eligibility requirements including: Continue reading »

Your Small Business: Getting Through the Economic Turbulence

A. Thomas DeWoskin

By A. Thomas DeWoskin



Part 1 of a 5-part series: Options for Small Business Owners in Financial Distress

turbulenceSuppose your small business has been doing fairly well over the last few months in spite of COVID-19 and the many other factors affecting our economy. However, you are worried about the upcoming change of seasons, additional shutdown orders, or other circumstances which might adversely affect it.

Or suppose you expect to do well over the holidays even in the face of (or because of) the pandemic, but dread your normally slow months of January, February, and March.

Or suppose you recently undertook a large project which fell apart and left you owing a ton of money.

Different situations require different responses.

Specific Event

If a specific event led to your problems, but your business is otherwise profitable, you may be able to work out of them.

Equipment Problems

Imagine that your business was doing so well that you bought additional equipment and hired additional employees in order to meet the demand.

Unfortunately, your new equipment didn’t work as promised. Rather than the promised six weeks, the new equipment took a year to get up and running smoothly. In addition to failing to fulfill all of your orders during this time, you paid employees overtime to produce as much as they could despite the distractions caused by the equipment problems. Continue reading »

Options for Small Business Owners in Financial Distress: A 5-Part Series

A. Thomas DeWoskin

By A. Thomas DeWoskin



options for business

Many small business owners are suffering financially due to the effects of COVID-19 and the unpredictable, rapidly changing economy in general. In this five-part series, we will discuss the various options available to small businesses in financial trouble, all the way from working out obligations informally to Chapter 11 reorganization to going out of business.

The series will cover the following issues:

Part 1: Your Small Business: The Economic Turbulence – Analyzing and improving your business operations

Part 2: Accumulating Cash and Improving Your Business’ Cash Flow – Analyzing and improving the business’ flow, as well as obtaining additional financing if necessary

Part 3: Non-bankruptcy solutions

Part 4: Pros and cons of various types of bankruptcy

Part 5: Getting through a bankruptcy case and coming out on the other side

Continue reading »

Updates Made to Three Main Street Loan Facilities from the Federal Reserve

Hannah E. Mudd

By Hannah E. Mudd



The Federal Reserve Board recently adjusted the terms of the Main Street Lending Program (MSLP) in an effort to focus their support on smaller businesses who continue to suffer due to the pandemic. The minimum loan size for the Main Street New Loan Facility (MSNLF), Main Street Priority Loan Facility (MSPLF), and Nonprofit Organization New Loans Facility (NONLF) have been reduced from $250,000 to $100,000. The fees on these three facilities have also been adjusted to encourage business owners to apply for these loans.

New Fee Amounts for the MSNLF, MSPLF, and NONLF

  • Transaction Fees: If the initial principal amount of the Eligible Loan is $250,000 or greater, an Eligible Lender will pay the Special Purpose Vehicle (SPV) a transaction fee of 100 basis points of the principal amount at the time of origination. Eligible Lenders may require Eligible Borrowers to pay this fee. No fee will be imposed if the initial principal amount is less than $250,000.
  • Origination Fees: If the initial principal amount of the loan is $250,000 or greater, an Eligible Borrower will pay an Eligible Lender an origination fee of up to 100 basis points of the principal amount at the time of origination. If the initial principal amount is less than $250,000, the origination fee will be up to 200 basis points of the principal amount at the time of origination.
  • Servicing Fees: If the initial principal amount of the loan is $250,000 or greater, the SPV will pay Eligible Lenders 25 basis points of the principal amount of its participation in the Eligible Loan per annum. If the initial principal amount is less than $250,000 the SPV will pay 50 basis points of the principal amount of its participation in the loan per annum.

PPP Loan Considerations Continue reading »

Access to Patient Medical Records During COVID-19

Laura Gerdes Long

By Laura Gerdes Long



Issues relating to a patient’s right of access to medical records have never been more important than now, in the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic.  Healthcare providers, big and small (from a large New York City non-profit providing health care and other services to the homeless population to small psychiatric services providers in Virginia and Colorado), are facing monetary penalties and having to comply with Corrective Action Plans (CAP) imposed by the Office for Civil Rights (OCR) with strict requirements and short deadlines.

One of these psychiatry services providers must distribute new policies and procedures concerning patient requests for records to all members of its workforce and relevant business associates within 30 days and to new employees upon hiring. Recipients are required to execute certification of having read, understood, and promised to abide by these policies and procedures. Training and individual certifications must be completed within 60 days. Going forward, the practice must implement annual training. Any reportable events must be fully investigated and described in a report as part of the full-scale written “Implementation Report.” The practice must submit the report to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) within 120 days. The CAP concludes with a “Final Report,” again containing specific terms and obligations of the psychiatry practice. Continue reading »

Department of Labor’s Updated Regulations for FFCRA

Lauren L. Wood

By Lauren L. Wood



The Department of Labor (DOL) published new guidelines on September 16, 2020 that revise and clarify portions of the Families First Coronavirus Relief Act (FFCRA). The new guidelines were issued following a ruling by a New York District Court that declared certain previously issued regulations invalid. These updated regulations relate to the following:

  • The requirement of “work availability,”
  • The requirement of employer approval for FFCRA leave to be intermittent,
  • The definition of “health care provider,” and
  • Requirements for notice and documentation.

The new regulations went into effect at the time they were published and will remain in effect until December 31, 2020 when the FFCRA is set to expire.

Work Availability Requirement

The DOL clarified that the work availability requirement applies to all qualifying reasons to take leave under the FFCRA. Thus, the leave may only be taken if the employer has work for the employee. The qualifying reason must be the actual reason the employee is unable to work, rather than not having work to do regardless of whether the qualifying reason occurs. Previously, the work availability requirement was only explicitly applicable to three of the six possible qualifying reasons for leave.

Intermittent Leave Requires Employer Approval Continue reading »

Guidance Released on Deferring Employee Social Security Taxes

Hannah E. Mudd

By Hannah E. Mudd



The IRS released guidance for employers regarding President Trump’s August 8, 2020 memorandum on withholding, deposit, and payment of employee Social Security taxes for the period of September 1, 2020 through December 31, 2020. Secretary of the Treasury Steven Mnuchin has since confirmed the deferral as voluntary and that employers may choose to continue to withhold and deposit employee Social Security taxes under the normal schedule.

The guidance clarifies that employees eligible for deferral are those with wages (for FICA purposes) of less than $4,000 per bi-weekly pay period or an equivalent amount for other pay periods. The deferral of eligibility determination must be made on a payroll-by-payroll basis. Any compensation not considered wages for FICA purposes does not count when making the determination of eligibility. It is also important to remember that ‘wages’ considered are not based on gross pay but are based on the amount of wages after nontaxable deductions. Continue reading »

Deadline Extended for Main Street Lending Program Loans

Hannah E. Mudd

By Hannah E. Mudd



The Federal Reserve’s Main Street Lending Program (MSLP) recently expanded to include two new loans specifically for nonprofit organizations. In addition to this further explanation, all the loan facilities offered under MSLP received a deadline extension.

Now all five facilities will see the SPV cease making purchases of participations in Eligible Loans after December 31, 2020. Of course, this is subject to change should the Federal Reserve and Department of the Treasury decide it is necessary to extend the facilities.

All our blog posts on this topic have been updated (see below) and term sheets and forms are available at Continue reading »

Loan Relief for Nonprofit Organizations Through the Main Street Lending Program Expansion

Hannah E. Mudd

By Hannah E. Mudd



UPDATED 11/9/2020

The Federal Reserve’s Main Street Lending Program (MSLP) has expanded to include two new loans specifically for nonprofit organizations: The Nonprofit Organization New Loan Facility (“NONLF”) and the Nonprofit Organization Expanded Loan Facility (“NOELF”). Nonprofit organizations will now be able to receive support from relief efforts similar to those available to for-profit entities. Many of the basic eligibility, certification, and fees track those already in place for for-profit counterparts.

How the Program Will Operate:nonlf loan noelf loan

  • Nonprofit organizations can access the Loan Participation Agreement form, borrower and lender certifications and covenants, and other required form agreements on the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston’s Main Street Lending Program Forms and Agreements website.
  • Lenders are encouraged to begin making loans immediately upon successful registration.
  • The NONLF and NOELF Special Purpose Vehicle (SPV) will purchase 95% of each eligible loan submitted if the required documentation is complete and transactions meet the relevant program facility’s requirements.

Program Definitions NONLF and NOELF Loans:

  • Eligible Lenders – The same eligible lenders provided for for-profit MSLP facilities.
  • Eligible Borrowers – Eligible Borrowers are nonprofit organizations:
    • Created or organized in the U.S. or under the laws of the U.S. with significant operations in the U.S. and a majority of its employees are based in the U.S.;
    • In continuous operation since January 1, 2015;
    • That are not an ineligible business[i];
    • With fewer than 15,000 employees or $5 billion or less in 2019 annual revenues;
    • With a minimum of 10 employees;
    • With an endowment under $3 billion;
    • With total non-donation revenues of at least 60% of expenses from 2017-2019[ii];
    • With a ratio of adjusted 2019 earnings of at least 2% before interest, depreciation, and amortization (EBIDA) to unrestricted 2019 operating revenue[iii];
    • With a ratio of at least 60 days of liquid assets[iv] at the time of loan origination to average daily expenses over the previous year;
    • With, at the time of origination, a ratio greater than 55% of unrestricted cash and investments to existing outstanding and undrawn available debt, plus the amount of any under the Facility, plus the amount of any CMS Accelerated and Advance Payments;
    • That are not a participant in another MSLP facility or the Primary Market Corporate Credit Facility; and
    • Have not received specific support under the Coronavirus Economic Stabilization Act of 2020 (Subtitle A of Title IV of the CARES Act).

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