New Illinois Recording Law Designed to Combat Fraudulent Filings Likely to Have Immediate Impact on Title Insurance Industry

David A. Zobel

By David A. Zobel

Illinois recorder of deeds offices are now authorized to implement fraud referral and review processes to detect and address fraudulent recorded instruments in their counties with the recent passage of Illinois House Bill 2832 (55 ILCS 5/3-5010.5).

The new law identifies 19 separate indications of potential fraud, but county recorders are each free to create a unique detection system for their county. Under these systems, once the recorder reasonably determines an instrument to be “fraudulent, unlawfully altered, or intended to unlawfully cloud or transfer the title of any real estate property,” the law affords the recorder two distinct courses of action.

First, recorder personnel may, at their own discretion, notify law enforcement officials, including the Department of Financial and Professional regulation, of the suspected fraud and request assistance for further review and potential criminal investigation.

Second, the recorder may, upon notice and confirmation of the potential fraud with the last owner of record, flag and refer the instrument to a local administrative law judge for hearing. If that judge determines the instrument to be legitimate, a judgment stating so would then be recorded along with the original instrument. However, if determined to be fraudulent, a judgment stating “that the document in question has been found to be fraudulent and shall not be considered to affect the chain of title of the property in any way” would then be recorded with the original instrument. No documents, regardless of legitimacy, would be “unrecorded” or struck from the county records.

Like many new laws, this new recording law is not without controversy. Proponents praise the law as an expedited and cost-effective alternative to filing a lawsuit to clear a victim’s title. However, critics complain the law unconstitutionally expands the powers of county recorders and may lead to unforeseen consequences in the recovering real estate industry.

While the ultimate effect (and constitutionality) of the new law remains to be seen, the law will almost certainly have an immediate impact on Illinois title companies. In some cases, it may lead to longer and more expensive administrative review and closing periods as title companies may be reluctant to insure any title during an active review/referral process. However, in others, the law’s finality in determining the legitimacy of unusual instruments in a chain of title may lead to decreased risks borne by title companies and thus decreased costs borne by the consumer.

Either way, the new law’s application and effect will certainly need to be considered by companies seeking to insure title in Illinois.

Posted by Attorney David A. Zobel. Zobel primarily represents individuals and corporations in the defense of civil litigation, including contract, negligence, and real estate matters. In addition to his court room work, Zobel assists in advising clients on contract and employment issues and regarding issues arising under the Sunshine Law.

 


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